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Viral induced wheeze, information for parents

What is viral induced wheeze?

Wheeze is a whistling noise that some children and babies make each time they have a cough or cold (viral infection).
The child is usually well in between viral infections but the wheeze may continue for some time.
Younger children (under age 3) are more often affected as they have narrow airway passages.

Does this mean my child has asthma?

Not necessarily but some of these children will go onto develop asthma, this is more likely if there is a family history of asthma or allergy and if wheezing happens even when they do not have a cold.

What treatment is needed?

If the child is well (not struggling to breath, feeding reasonably well, no fever/fever responding well to calpol and being reasonably active) then usually no treatment is needed, although sometimes the GP may suggest trying an inhaler or giving a short course of oral steroid medication.

If the child is having difficulty breathing (they may look like they are working hard to breath), is lethargic, not feeding well or has high fever then they need to be seen urgently.  During the day please contact the surgery to request an urgent appointment.  If it is out of hours then please contact Barndoc however if the child seems very unwell then you should take them to A and E. 



 
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